Museums are for everyone. If you are living with memory impairment or care for someone who does, we welcome you to Arts & Minds.

When you attend one of our 90-minute museum programs, you will be greeted by one of our arts educators. You will have a few minutes to settle in and meet the other participants. Everyone gets a name tag and the educator introduces the activities ahead.

From there, we’re off to the gallery where we’ll gather around a selected work to look at and talk about the art or object. Sometimes we even get to handle the materials!

The educator will provide background about the artist and lead a group conversation exploring everyone’s observations, thoughts, and ideas.

After the gallery discussion, we’ll move to a workshop where we have all the tools necessary to create, experiment with materials and work in the moment. At Arts & Minds everyone is an artist! There are no mistakes. Whatever happens, happens.

We’ll take time to talk about what everyone has made; what inspires us, how we feel about it and what it makes us think.

At the end of the program, you’ll get to take home your work as well as a photo of the artwork we discussed. We hope you’ll continue the conversation and fill your days with art!

The ART side:

Art has the power to inspire and transform. It opens our eyes and minds and enhances our interactions with others. The experience of looking closely allows us to appreciate beauty, exchange ideas, share memories or simply respond to the work in front of us. Art interpretation taps into cognition, emotion and memory to take us to the
heart of what it means to be human. Making art in hands-on workshops allows us to express ourselves creatively with or without words. Through shared aesthetic experiences, care partners learn that, despite cognitive changes, they are able to interact with a greater sense of who they are.

The SCIENCE side:

Alzheimer’s disease is one of the most common medical conditions associated with aging. Existing medications target memory loss, mood disorders, and behavioral disruptions, but there is not yet a cure. Caring for a person with dementia challenges the stamina, psychological wellbeing and general health of family, friends, and professional caregivers. The condition known as caregiver burnout is perhaps one of the more subtle problems accompanying Alzheimer’s disease. Non-drug interventions, including cognitively and emotionally stimulating arts activities, can benefit both patients and caregivers. Arts & Minds gives caregivers the tools—from brushes to positive experiences—to use in living well. Participants tell us that our programs create positive emotional connections with art and one another.heart of what it means to be human. Making art in hands-on workshops allows us to express ourselves creatively with or without words. Through shared aesthetic experiences, care partners learn that, despite cognitive changes, they are able to interact with a greater sense of who they are.

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